Four years flew by!

If I can think of one word to describe this university it would be empowering. It’s rare that you’ll encounter a unfriendly face in this town. My four years have gone by too quickly and I had an amazing time recruiting new shining faces to the college this summer. I can’t wait to hear about all the amazing things they’ll do in the future! I guess if I could think of 4 takeaways it would be these:

-Write out essays for scholarships even in they’re optional.

– Thank you notes matter! Take the time to say thanks to those who help you out!

-Know why you worth investing in and be able to explain that verbally and in written for interviews and scholarships.

-You pay for class, on campus events and resources use them. Bars and parties aren’t included in your fees.

I wish the world was more like a Zumba class

Over the past four years, my favorite place on campus has been the Rec. Good day or bad day I could always find a reason to go there. I’ve taken belly dancing, abs class, salsa, Bootylicious, hip hop aerobics, and nothing bring me joy like a good hard Zumba workout. If you ever wondered what diversity looks like peep your head into room 104 at 12:10 or 5:30pm.

You would see people dancing without a care in the world. Men and Women of all shapes, sizes, ethnicities, ages, majors and sexual orientations. It’s one of the few places in higher education where you won’t find yourself put into a box. No one is talking about what sorority they’re in, or how much their parents make and no one is judging you no matter how bad you think your dancing is. I’m not sure why doing squats to a T.I song and doing the cumbia generate a universal sense of belonging, but it does and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

20something profile: Paige

I was featured on the 20Something’s blog! Check out the post!

20somethings Blog

InterviewThis post was written by Paige, a college senior majoring in marketing:

Hello everyone, I’m Paige Nash, a senior marketing major from Texas Tech University, and I plan to graduate this August.

I was born and raised in Dallas, Texas, and I was never quite sure what I wanted to do other than have a fabulous office in a big sky rise building. By getting involved at my high school, the Business Magnet at Yvonne A. Ewell Townview Magnet Center, I found out that business — and more specifically, marketing — was my passion.

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Short Hair Don’t Care!

Lies! You do care! After you flipped the table on the stylist and cried ugly Kardashian like tears in the parking lot  you probably started googling “How to make my hair grow faster, how to hide short hair, cute hats, big hats, costs of extensions, and weave 101.”

You probably heard “Length over Health” “It’s just hair” and “It’ll grow back”
Those things don’t address that your hair is still short and you don’t like it.
Here are some tips on retaining length and hair mistakes from JustGrowAlready.com you can read more of them in the Beginners Hair Guide on her blog.

  • Keeping my ends moisturized. Our ends are the oldest part of our hair and thus require the most moisture. 
  • Protective styles. This reinforces the bullet point above but protective styling also help me cut down on manipulation and helped me to just leave my hair alone.
  • Decreased use of direct heat. Using direct heat (blow drying, hot combs, flat irons) on your hair isn’t a bad thing, but should be done in moderation. Frequent use of heat can dry out and damages hair.
  • Weekly deep conditioning to restore moisture and elasticity to my hair.

You can always buy some Biotin from your local vitamin store, use hair oils such as castor oil, drink plenty of water and eat clean.

So now you have the enormous task of pretending that you like your hair cut. Stop seeing it as a mistake and just use it as an excuse to go shopping!

Image

Image

 

You’re sophisticated, you’re edgy, you’re fierce. Snap in a circle, twirl, yell out “YAASS!” for no reason.

My Love Hate Relationship With Social Media

I’ve always been a big fan of social media, even in junior high at 13 I was on Xanga before I pledged my allegiance to Myspace freshman year. It’s fun! It gives you the ability to connect with people all over the world and people you’ve know forever. However, I feel like we’ve entered this period of social over sharing where we feel obligated and expected to connect with every single person that we’ve ever come in contact with.

The person you met once at a party adds you on Facebook, a friend of a friend of a friend adds you on Linkedin, your mom is following you on twitter, and your baby sister is on instagram. And people get offended if you don’t follow back or accept their request. So here you are feeling obligated to add someone you barely know or someone who you’d rather not share information with because you know them in real life.

Now you have to limit what you post, be aware of you say and comment on, and where you take pictures. You just wanted to post a photo of you and your friends now you have to put on a jacket, move the wine glasses out of the way, and make sure nothing incriminating is in the background so your Granny, Boss, and Sunday school teacher won’t think you’re a skank and a drunk. (Even though you’re legal and really like that strapless dress.)

Sometimes I like to watch, say, and do things that have nothing to do with my career goals or my university– it’s just for fun! There are things I would never walk into a classroom or interview room and say, but with social media I feel like I’m yelling them in people’s ears. Sometimes I like to do things without commentary, criticism, and feedback. I just wanted to express myself honestly. When I was in elementary we used to have “Free writes” for bell ringers, draw or write anything you want for 15 minutes. It’s not for a grade, you don’t have swap with your neighbor, and I won’t read it. My teacher would say

“I just want to get your creative juices flowing and let you get anything off your chest.”

If I tweet “I hate burger king” I don’t want to explain why I hate it. I don’t want a 15 tweet dialogue comparing various burger joints from my followers, or you saying you love burger king and I’m crazy! No one was talking about what you like, I was saying what I like.  I’m not writing a compare and contrast essay. Maybe someone doesn’t want to be asked about why their relationship ended when they come into the office on Monday. It’s personal. And don’t get me started about how people psycho-analyze tweets, sub-tweets, and photos and come up with these crazy ideas. (Somebody somewhere is probably writing a dissertation about Rihanna’s instagram and twitter)
Sometimes school friends are only people you wish to converse with at school, and work friends are only people you’d wish to talk to at work; but how do you let them know that?

What do you think? Am I just easily annoyed? Do you see people over sharing and overstepping their boundaries on social media? Do you feel like you’re always being watched??

What Natural Hair products taught me about Supply and Demand

I was at Target in Cedar Hill , Texas and I noticed how big the ethnic hair care section was.  I stopped and stared. The section in Target was not this large before I left for school, and the section in Lubbock, Texas isn’t this large.

This was what I remembered not too long ago, an endcap at the end of the aisle.

Now it’s in two places the end cap and the entire row with full product lines.

this is only a section of the products, but as you can see a significant increase from the endcap.  (Sorry for the blurriness, it’s awkward taking pictures of products)

Nubian Heritage has its own row, Shea Moisture has its own row, Mixed chicks has its own row that goes all the way down as well as a lot of other brands.

It’s not that they had a lot of hair products, but a lot of  it was for Natural hair and was even broken up into two sections “Natural and textured” and “relaxed”. This takes detail. If you go to Walmart it simply says “Ethnic Hair”  one aisle full of Ampro, Blue Magic, and God knows what else. These labels mean they did some research; They know who they’re targeting, what they want, and they’re not just gonna buy it because there’s a brown person on the label. Someone paid real attention to it.

Why?

Because Target is awesome, but besides that I believe it has to do with demand. Taking care of your hair is trendy right now. Women are going in droves to the store to get natural and organic products for their hair. If you’ve watched commercials for any type of hair they’re featuring natural ingredients. “with honey extract” “olive oil” and “grapeseed oil”.  L’oreal launched their “sulfate free line and have even expanded it (EverStrong, EverySleek, EvereCreme, and EverPure). (I love the EverStrong  in the green bottle) Consumers are more informed and more adamant about what they will and won’t use in a hair product. This is a perfect example about how consumers feel about multicultural marketing. It takes real work, consumers want companies to be authentic in trying to reach them.  It made me think of an article I read in Adweek a long while a go by  Robert Klara.

Which made think, if we were to show the companies that we as a minority community made it known to the companies that we wanted better for ourselves they’d be forced to fill that demand. Who remembers when you could only buy certain hair brands online?  Why is there a Central Market, Whole Foods, and Trader Joe’s  within spitting distance of each other in North Dallas, but in other areas only dollar stores, Popeyes, and liquor stores are the only thing that seem to be placed in our areas. It has a lot to do with demographics, but let’s not forget we have a voice outside of what statistics say.

What do you think? Comment below or tweet me at @Paige_Nash!

Top Five hair products from Target: 1. Fekkai Shea Butter Conditioner & Shampoo 3. Shea Moisture Anti Breakage Masque, 3. L’oreal EverStrong No Sulfate Shampoo 4. Neutrogena Triple Moisture Shampoo & Conditioner. I also purchase the majority of my oils there.

1. Castor Oil
2. Olive Oil
3. Lavender Oil
4. Tea Tree Oil

If you would like to know more about my staple hair products visit  (pinterest.com/thatnash/paige-s-staple-hair-products/)

Intern Hack No. 4: What to put on your resume

How to Beat the ‘Black Hole’

You don’t have to be an astronomer to know about one kind of black hole: the online job application process.

But have hope. There are things you can do to increase the chances of getting your résumé through employers’ applicant screening systems, say experts Josh Bersin, CEO of human-resources consulting firm Bersin & Associates and Rusty Rueff, career and workplace expert at Glassdoor.

Below, five tips to up your odds:

  • 1. Forget about being creative. Instead, mimic the keywords in the job description as closely as possible. If you’re applying to be a sales manager, make sure your résumé includes the words “sales” and “manage” (assuming you’ve done both!).
  • 2. Visit the prospective employer’s website to get a sense of the corporate culture. Do they use certain words to describe their values? If a firm has a professed interest in environmental sustainability, include relevant volunteer work or memberships on your résumé. The company may have programmed related keywords into its resume screening software.
  • 3. Keep the formatting on your résumé simple and streamlined—you don’t want to perplex the software. With a past position, the system “sometimes gets confused about which is the company, which is the position, and which are the dates you worked there,” especially if they’re all on a single line, says Mr. Bersin. To make sure you hit all the categories, put them on separate lines. And “don’t get cute with graphics and layout,” says Mr. Rueff.
  • 4. Some screening systems assign higher scores to elite schools. You may not have gotten your B.A. from a top-tier university, but if you attended a continuing-education class at one, include such qualifications on your résumé.
  • 5. But don’t ever lie or exaggerate just to get through the screening process. Recruiters and ATSs are savvy about tricks jobseekers use (such as typing false qualifications in white font). “You don’t want to get through the black hole and find out it’s a worse hole you got yourself into,” Mr. Rueff says

This article “how to beat the black hole” by the WSJ was super informative. a lot of companies have computers that pull your resume and scan for keywords and other info to select you go to the next round. I know what you’re thinking, your whole life you’ve been told to make your resume stand out. We’ll crazy formatting, and made up words to describe your last position might not be the best way to get there. last spring I visited an oil company in the Houston area and spoke with the hiring manager. She informed us that no one is spending hours reading resumes by hand. She spends less than 60 seconds on a resume to find out if they’re in or out.

Here are her top 3 applicant killers:

1. Bad formatting

  • Your resume should not look like connect the dots.
  • Make everything line up correctly.
  • Your resume shouldn’t be wild colors, or have a photo on it.

2. Lack of contact info

  • You would be surprised how many people actually leave off how to contact them. They might put their name and forget everything else.

3. Spelling

  • Self explanatory.

Here’s what I suggest. You might want to have separate resumes. One that you would hand out in person and one to submit online. For example the gentlemen below has a killer resume even online it stands strong. This would be great to hand out at a job fair, or after to get the interview in person, however it might confuse this computer with the qr code.

There are lots of ways you can use these tips and still stand out for example check out “Hire-matt.com” and click on his resume tab.

The original article can be found here: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204624204577178941034941330.html