What you need to know about Business Cards

These are pretty much the coolest business cards I’ve ever seen. I got a Klout perk for some for free and checked out their site. If you’re a creative person (Graphic Design, Fashion, Photography, Modeling, Accessories Maker, Musician) I’d HIGHLY recommend these. They have plenty designs to choose from, or you can upload your own art. The cool thing about Moo.com is that each card can be customized to say a different thing. The only things is with the perk you have to have Klout on the front 😦

These are some what my practice card until I perfect what I should have on them for the long haul.

Check out my favorites below

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Take 10% off by clicking here: http://www.moo.com/share/tx2ptb or join Klout.com and get the perk yourself for FREE!

You can also check out Vistaprint for some free cards or the career center at your college. The Career Management Center at Texas Tech offers business cards for a low cost.

When designing my card I started to wonder what makes a good creative business card? What should I have on it? QR code? A photo? I stumbled upon this article What College Students Should Have on Business Cards.

What to Include 

Contact information should be the main focus on college students’ business cards and should include: name, phone number and e-mail address .

“If you want, you can include ‘NYU class of 2011’, or you can include what field you’re in, such as ‘marketing professional’,” says Pollak.

Tony Conrad, founder of About.me, points out that if you have a URL that recruiters might be interested in (such as a professional blog, or personal Web site) you can include a QR code.

“The fact that you have [a QR code] and understand it and that you’re using emerging technology, that shows that you’re ambitious enough to seek out something new and implement it to your benefit,” he says. “It means they can contact you for your specific talents and start the conversation already knowing some of your background.”

Creativity

Depending on the field (especially in graphic design, architecture, art, etc.), experts encourage students to get creative with their cards.

Conrad advises students include an aesthetically-pleasing image that makes a statement rather than going for shock value.

“Well-shot photography and clean typography has been a winning strategy in advertising for more than a century,” he says. “If you think of yourself as a luxury brand, present yourself as a luxury brand.”

I also read this article on Forbes.com

Make Your Business Card Stand Out

Don Crowther thinks you should put your picture on your business card. Not only that, but he wants you to include a mini-résumé, your Twitter handle and some sort of special offer that entices each recipient to get in touch.

Check out both of these articles and get yourself a deck of business cards!

 

**Update**

My Business cards are here! If you sign up with About.me you can also get some free business cards!

Business Cards

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Intern Hack No. 2: Job Description Deception

You’re scouring the job boards for an internship, or full time position. You’re eager to put everything you’ve learned in college to work and you think you’ve found a great job that works with marketing! You run across an entry that has buzz words like

Business to business sales, direct marketing methods, and other pay.

After going through an exciting first interview you find yourself in the middle of some unknown location selling something to patron on the street or going door to door on a commission only salary.

Not what you expected right?

The thing about marketing is that is covers such a broad range of activities. A lot of what is posted on job boards is sales, and to the untrained eye you might not realize that’s what you’re signing up for. Nothing is worse than applying for a job, and realizing that it’s not the right fit. The best way to combat this is to know what exactly you field you’re looking for.
Who remembers Vector Marketing the company that sells knives door-to-door?

This one is pretty vague, does this sound like you’re driving around town being a door-to-door knives salesman?

Here are some items to look over before you submit that application:

1. Identify what exactly you want from a job. What skills do you have and what would like to earn through your new career.

2. Find your career spirit animal. What does this mean? (I just made it up) Find someone who is doing what you would like to do, and learn what their job title is and what it entails. Hopefully you can network with them, and find out what to look for in your search from someone who has been there.

3. Linkedin- I often type in a job title or company name and see what they have listed under their job description–slightly creepy, but this is the  life or death of your career we’re talking about.Or if you’re not a creeper like me you can check out company websites to find out what they’re job description says so you know what you’re looking for.

Sales isn’t for everyone, and some really thrive at it. Be sure you know what you’re getting yourself into.

4. Most importantly during the interview ask them what a day in the life entails. Nothing is glamorous all the time is this is a very good question to find out if you would want to do this EVERY DAY and it shows interest.

Usually it’s a bad sign if a MARKETING company has little or no presence online, if they’re extremely vague, or if you go to their building and it’s just an empty office with no phones or furniture.

Horror Stories

Jane Doe* is a recent college graduate, and went to search for a job in NY. She had a phenomenal interview with a marketing department, and for her second interview she ended up in a bad part of the city trying to convince people to change energy providers. She was only paid if she got a person to sign up for the new service. She had to find her way home from this remote location, and catch the Subway home!

John Doe* is a college senior wanting to break into the sports and marketing field. He found a internship position for a marketing company in his area, and had a successful interview. He noticed that the office was nearly empty, but assumed they were remodeling.  The 2nd interview would be from 8-6pm. Once he showed up they drove to Austin, Texas where they spent the day selling tickets to a minor league baseball team in the 100 degree heat. Solicitation to businesses is illegal and even had to duck or hide from police when asked what they were doing!